News from Flagship Three: Food Safety

Food safety is moving rapidly up the development agenda as major new studies reveal its severely under-estimated importance. Foodborne disease is responsible for an enormous health burden and negative livelihood, nutritional, and economic impacts. There is an urgent need for technical and institutional solutions to food safety challenges, and broader policy research is expected to have influenced tens of millions of consumers, millions of farmers, and thousands of market agents working in priority countries in Africa and Asia.

 

To learn more about A4NH's work on Food Safety, please visit the Food Safety Flagship page.

 

Below are news stories, blog posts, and other information that help inform research and progress in this area.

Symposium Offers Opportunities to Share Lessons on Pork Production, Safety

Pork has great nutritional and economic impacts in Southeast Asia. Smallholder pig production plays a critical role in this sector, and research into health, safety, and development is in great demand from policymakers, the private sector, and other stakeholders.

Ensuring Food Safety Investments Are People-Focused

Thanks to the efforts of the Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG) and others, foodborne disease is getting the attention it deserves as a major global health issue. Children and poor people suffer the most from foodborne diseases — the same groups who also suffer from other health burdens such as undernutrition. In such >> Read more

New $6 Million Donor Investment to Tackle Causes of Foodborne Disease in Ethiopia

The UK Government's Department for International Development (DFID) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) are supporting four new research projects to address a broad set of robust and large-scale research priorities to guide program and policy efforts to improve food safety in Ethiopia.

Does Aflatoxin Stunt Child Growth? Evidence From the First Randomized Trial

Aflatoxins are, without question, dangerous poisons. Produced by molds that widely contaminate foods and feed, particularly in key staple crops such as maize and groundnuts, they cannot be seen, tasted, or smelled. Yet they take an enormous toll on health and economies across Africa and beyond