News from Flagship Two: Biofortification

Micronutrient deficiency affects approximately 2 billion people globally and is caused by poor-quality diets resulting in low intakes of key micronutrients. Children who are micronutrient deficient in early childhood are at a much higher risk of infections, and less able to recover than healthy children.

Biofortification uses plant breeding to improve the nutritional content of food crops, especially staple foods that poor people already consume, in order to reduce inadequate intakes and micronutrient deficiency in the most at-risk populations. A4NH's work in this area builds on the strong track record of HarvestPlus, which leads the flagship, working to develop and deliver new, more nutritious varieties of staple food crops that provide higher amounts of vitamin A, iron, or zinc. By the end of 2016, more than 140 biofortified varieties of 10 crops were released in over 30 countries.

To learn more about A4NH's work on Biofortification, please visit the Biofortification Flagship page.

Below are news stories, blog posts, and other information that help inform research and progress in this area.

New Partnership to Improve Nutrition for Millions

(Cross-posted from HarvestPlus website.) DAVOS, Switzerland, January 23, 2014. HarvestPlus and World Vision today signed a MoU at the World Economic Forum in Davos, making a commitment to work together to improve nutrition for hundreds of millions of people around the world who suffer from hidden hunger.

2012 Report Launch: On the Path to Better Nutrition and Health

Today we are proud to release our inaugural A4NH annual report, coinciding with the start of our 4th Center Focal Point & Planning and Management Committee Meeting held in Kenya.  Farmers are growing more food than ever. Yet, insufficient diets and micronutrient deficiencies remain among the most pressing nutritional problems worldwide, especially among commonly neglected groups >> Read more

Study finds that more nutritious pearl millet can meet full iron needs of children

Washington, D.C., August 12, 2013. A study just published in the, Journal of Nutrition shows that pearl millet bred to contain more iron can provide young children with their full daily iron needs. Pearl millet is an important staple food in semi-arid regions of India and Africa, where iron deficiency is widespread. Lack of iron impairs mental >> Read more

‘Superfoods’ to combat hidden hunger

Eight biofortified foods are being developed to combat nutrient deficiencies that can cause blindness and anaemia Fabiola Ortiz for IPS, part of the Guardian development network theguardian.com, Thursday 18 July 2013 09.51 EDT