News from Flagship Two: Biofortification

Micronutrient deficiency affects approximately 2 billion people globally and is caused by poor-quality diets resulting in low intakes of key micronutrients. Children who are micronutrient deficient in early childhood are at a much higher risk of infections, and less able to recover than healthy children.

Biofortification uses plant breeding to improve the nutritional content of food crops, especially staple foods that poor people already consume, in order to reduce inadequate intakes and micronutrient deficiency in the most at-risk populations. A4NH's work in this area builds on the strong track record of HarvestPlus, which leads the flagship, working to develop and deliver new, more nutritious varieties of staple food crops that provide higher amounts of vitamin A, iron, or zinc. By the end of 2016, more than 140 biofortified varieties of 10 crops were released in over 30 countries.

To learn more about A4NH's work on Biofortification, please visit the Biofortification Flagship page.

Below are news stories, blog posts, and other information that help inform research and progress in this area.

“On the Road to 1 Billion:” Podcast Features Howdy Bouis of HarvestPlus

This episode from the Nourishing Millions podcast series features Howarth "Howdy" Bouis, 2016 World Food Prize Laureate and HarvestPlus founder.

Dietary diversity and biofortification – Closer than you think

Some 2 billion people suffer from hidden hunger caused by infections and diets lacking in essential micronutrients such as vitamin A, iron, and zinc. This is particularly the case in the developing world, where diets mainly consist of starchy staples and not enough nutrient-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, beans and pulses, and animal source >> Read more

Going Global: 2014 progress from HarvestPlus

HarvestPlus recently released the 2014 edition of their annual report, entitled, Going Global. The report reflects the growing reach of biofortified nutritious staple food crops, now being grown by farmers in dozens of countries. From Nollywood movies and pop songs extolling the benefits that these foods can provide, to new scientific evidence to back it all >> Read more

Improving child health through agriculture: orange sweet potatoes

A4NH welcomes guest-bloggers, Kelly M. Jones and Alan de Brauw from the Markets, Trade, and Institutions Division of IFPRI. Cross-posted from IFPRI blog series highlighting research in progress.   Despite a great deal of discussion about linkages between agriculture, nutrition, and health, both inside and outside the CGIAR, until now there is almost no rigorous evidence that interventions to increase >> Read more